Cosmetic utensils

Silk Road Style: Turkmen and Central Asian Accessories

Sept.7 (Wed), 2016-Mar.3 (Fri), 2017

Introduced here are Turkmen accessories and a special collection of antique ornaments and cosmetic utensils.
The Turkmen are a nomadic people located in regions of Turkmenistan in Central Asia. Because of their position along the Silk Road, their distinctive ornaments reflect influences of both Eastern and Western cultures.
The gilded silver and gold ornaments inlaid with red carnelian and other stones were mainly intended for women. These accessories were also considered to be protective amulets and served as well as insurance against economic difficulty. Different tribes have their particular style, and the status of wearers as members of a certain tribe is apparent from the patterns and craftsmanship of their accessories.
Cosmetics date to the beginnings of civilization. Through the ages, cosmetic accessories such as mirrors and containers were adapted to the cultures along the Silk Road and eventually transmitted as far as Europe and the United States in the West and Japan in the East. This exhibit reflects upon the somewhat exotic origins of make-up that is so familiar to us.

Bukov, Tekke or Yomud, Early 19th century

Bukov, Tekke or Yomud, Early 19th century

Cap jewellery for girls of marriageable age, Tekke, Early 19th century

Cap jewellery for girls of marriageable age, Tekke, Early 19th century

Two-part rhomboid fasteners sewn at waist height on the yokes women's mantle, Tekke, Early 19th century

Two-part rhomboid fasteners sewn at waist height on the yokes women's mantle, Tekke, Early 19th century

Painted pottery for perfumed oil in the form of hedgehog, Greece, 6th century BC

Painted pottery for perfumed oil in the form of hedgehog, Greece, 6th century BC